Ellen Brenneman has created art nearly all her life and has worked as a full-time artist since 2012. She regularly works on one series per year and receives the most joy when painting the fiber and form of nature.

Ellen Brenneman is a full time artist who regularly works on one series per year and receives the most joy when painting the fiber and form of nature.

Creative Spirit Ellen Brenneman

Carrie:  Welcome to Artist Strong Ellen, when did you first realize you were an artist?

When I was in grade school my art teacher took me aside during class one day and commented on a drawing I had just completed. He told me that I had a natural talent and to always nurture it. He said that when I grew up I could be an artist. This memory holds a special meaning to me because as a child I knew nothing about labels or limitations. As children we believe we can be anything. Years later I drifted away from art for a while because I lost faith in my abilities but at that moment with my art teacher I really felt like I was an artist.

Carrie: How did you discover your artistic style?

Even though I have been painting for many years, I feel I’ve just begun to settle into my true artistic style while working on my current series, Power Animals of the Planet. I’m deeply connected to this body of work and it shows through my use of symbolism, choice of color and the way I handle my paint. I feel my style has evolved because I’ve never felt more passionate about my subjects than I feel about this series.

Carrie: If you had to choose three words to describe your art, what would they be?

Vibrant

Spiritual

Uplifting

Carrie: What does your workspace look like?

If you were to walk into my art studio you would find it filled with things that inspire me to create such as feathers, stones and photographs of places or people that bring me happiness. I’ve also begun collecting work from fellow artists that I admire.

My art table is usually congested with bottles of ink, acrylic paint and various brushes. There are ink splatters everywhere, even the walls.

Ellen Brenneman is a full time artist who regularly works on one series per year and receives the most joy when painting the fiber and form of nature.

‘Elephant Spirit’, part of the Power Animals of the Planet series, painted on Yupo paper using acrylic and India Inks

Carrie: How do your interests outside of art fuel your artwork?

Several years ago I became interested in traditional yoga which gave me a greater understanding of my place in this world and whom I share it with. My artwork is heavily influenced by this philosophy. In addition, I have always loved the outdoors. To me, there is no greater source of inspiration than stepping outside and observing everything nature has to offer.

Ellen Brenneman is a full time artist who regularly works on one series per year and receives the most joy when painting the fiber and form of nature.

Rabbit Spirit, painted on Yupo paper using acrylic, alcohol and india inks.

Carrie: How do you navigate the feelings of vulnerability that show up during the creative process?

For me, the best way to keep negative chatter to a minimum is to never lose sight of why I started creating in the first place.

In January 2015 I had major shoulder surgery. When I awoke, 3 fingers in my dominant hand had no feeling.. The thought of not being able to paint for months to come or never regaining the feeling in my fingers had me quite depressed. I knew that the only way to stay connected to my art was to begin painting with my non dominant hand while my shoulder recovered.

The paintbrush initially felt so awkward in my left hand and at that moment I’d never felt more vulnerable in my life, but once I started painting I couldn’t concentrate on anything other than the pure joy of the process itself. Before my surgery I focused a good deal of energy comparing myself to others, always striving to be ‘better’ instead of appreciating the skills I already had. The fear of permanently losing my ability to paint was the reminder I needed of why I started painting in the first place: for the the joy of it.

Carrie: How do you know when an artwork is finished?

I never consider a piece of artwork finished until it has been signed, and I never sign my work until it has been purchased and is ready to be shipped out. This is a habit I picked up from my years of working as a mixed-media artist when older pieces were reworked and/or recycled multiple times before being considered truly finished.

Carrie: What is one piece of advice you have for struggling creatives?

Allow social media to work for you, not against you. Use sites like Facebook and Instagram as tools to help you grow your business and connect with like-minded individuals, but don’t value your worth on the number of Likes and/or shares you receive. Paying too much attention to who is or isn’t paying attention to you is a sure fire way to kill your self confidence and dull your creative spirit.

Ellen Brenneman is a full time artist who regularly works on one series per year and receives the most joy when painting the fiber and form of nature.

‘Panther Spirit’, part of the Power Animals of the Planet series, painted on Yupo paper using acrylic and india inks.

Carrie: How has social media and the internet helped you as an artist?

Social media has been an amazing resource for me because it has allowed me to connect with unbelievably kind, supportive people. I receive the most interaction with those who follow me on Facebook, many of whom live thousands of miles away. Knowing that my art is reaching people all over the world is absolutely incredible to me.

Social media has also allowed me to develop deeply meaningful friendships with other artists both online and in person and I feel so fortunate to be connected to so many like-minded, talented people.

Carrie: What strategies would you suggest to artists for them to harness social media?

There are new social media sites popping up all of the time, and it’s easy to get caught up in the idea that it’s necessary to belong to and participate in as many as possible, but I feel it’s more important to commit oneself to two or three sites and use them regularly than to sign up for more than one can handle. Marketing and networking can be exhausting so be realistic and make sure that studio time comes first on your list of priorities.

Ellen Brenneman is a full time artist who regularly works on one series per year and receives the most joy when painting the fiber and form of nature.

Lion Study – painted as part of my non dominant hand series while recovering from major shoulder surgery, Feb, 2015

Carrie:  What is one creative resource you can’t live without?

I have two, actually. Wetcanvas.com is a wonderful resource for artists, both beginners and advanced. There you can find an infinite wealth of information and support from fellow creatives. Another wonderful website, Artfairinsiders.com was an invaluable resource to me when I made the decision to start participating in art fairs.

Carrie: Who/what inspires you?

I gain so much inspiration simply by walking in my backyard or hiking on a nearby trail, and when I’m lucky enough to visit one of our National Parks I nearly burst with inspiration. The wild outdoors inspires me more than anything and my work would certainly be stifled without it, particularly in my current series.  

Carrie:  How do you define Creativity?

Creativity is an ever-evolving unspoken language. It allows me to convey my thoughts and feelings without any explanation, and it has the power to evoke the same in others as well. Creativity truly a powerful form of communication.

“Creativity is an ever-evolving unspoken language.” (Click to Tweet)

BE COURAGEOUSLY CREATIVE: Have you tried making art with a non dominant hand? Try warming up with your art this week by drawing with your non dominant hand. Tell me in the comments below: how did it make you feel? What did you learn from the experience?

Additional Contact Info:

https://www.facebook.com/EllenBrennemanStudio

http://ellenbrennemanstudio.com/

http://ellenbrennemanstudio.etsy.com

 

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